How Iran could cause an energy crunch

“Could Iran cause an energy crunch? It’s been said that the line between order and disorder is the thin blue line of the law. I would also like to enhance this saying by exchanging the word line for the pipeline.”

Oil dependence

Oil dependence

The pipeline concerned is the one carrying oil supplies from Iran, on which, over the last decade, European countries such as Spain, Italy and Greece have become very dependent.

These countries also have to deal with the fact that their ailing economies are dependent on this risky and possibly unstable state, with other European and British communities facing problems too if these countries’ economies fail.

With recent diplomatic and Special Force skirmishes going on with Iran, are we biting the hand that feeds us when so many of us depend on the oil which originates from this religious state?

Another worrying fact, which politicians did not see when the Arab Springs happened earlier this year, was the changes called for by protestors, which may not necessarily be the changes that the West wants.

Many of the countries which were most affected by the Arab Springs -Tunisia, Egypt and Syria – are now seeing strong Islamic politics coming forward for power. The same thing happened in Iran with the downfall of the Shah.

When put into context with the 1977 Iranian revolution, which swept pro-Western influence and power away and replaced it with anti-Western policies, it also caused energy shortages at that time too.

Whether we like it or not, hard line, religion-based politics are spreading in the Middle East overall and more worryingly, in countries like Turkey which has traditionally been more liberal in its religious tolerance.

The writing is on the wall. Lessons have to be learned from history, the effects of which we still see today. Iran may not have the technological advantage, but what they do have is the power to cut or constrict Europe’s umbilical cord to growth and economic recovery at best, or at worst, to cause oil price shocks and monumentally-high energy price rises.

Stuart Lovatt, the founder of Heat my Home says “Whether we like it or not, our reliance nationally and personally on energy supplies from the troubled and politically volatile territories should make each of us more aware of the increasingly thinner black line which our society depends upon so much.”

Dependence on traditional sources of energy will always be there for many households, but having a secondary source of energy will always be welcomed if our politicians do happen to stumble aimlessly into yet another impossible to win the conflict.

The picture that I paint here may not be bright, but with solar panels on your home, you may certainly be assured that, for the next 30 years, you can be less concerned with events occurring in Tehran, Cairo, and Damascus.

The fight for civilisation is won; the challenge of keeping it has just begun.



Author.

"Feel the pride."
December 10, 2011
Founder of Heat My Home.


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